Could the next thing you read here change your life?

There’s news. And then there’s news. The news that comes out of the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center can change lives. For people with diabetes and those who care for them, and about them. So it makes sense to stay on top of all the latest — with both Berrie Center Direct news and In the Headlines, the frequent media coverage we get based on our important and exciting findings and the authoritative voices that speak for us.

Go To: In The Headlines

Berrie Center Direct

There’s always something going on here at the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center. Promising research. Special events. Success stories from our patients and their families. Stop by often to see the latest.

Click on the links below to see what’s happening at the Berrie Center.


Give me an H-A-I-L-E-Y!

An interview with Berrie Center patient and star cheerleader Hailey Cavuoto and her biggest supporter, her mom Jackie

Having type 1 diabetes (T1D) doesn’t stop Hailey Cavuoto, age 11, from soaring high. Hailey is a 6th grader at Somers Middle School in Somers, New York. She is also a competitive cheerleader who loves to perform. Hailey (and her supportive mom) spent a minute of her precious time with us to share what it takes to manage her T1D while flipping and flying on stage.


Julia Sherr Unites Family & Friends for a Holiday Berrie Center Toy Drive

When one family member lives with type 1 diabetes (T1D), inevitably it effects the entire family. Such is the case with 16-year-old Julia Sherr. Julia’s older brother, Matthew, was diagnosed with T1D at age six. With his diagnosis came many challenges, some good days and some not so good. Julia feels as if she has been on the journey right beside him.


Dr. Kristen Williams Addresses T1D FAQs for School Nurses

Pediatric endocrinologist Kristen Williams, MD, recently to spoke at a gathering of New York City school nurses on the topic of type 1 diabetes (T1D). From the history of the disease to the current delivery systems for insulin, Dr. Williams was on hand to disseminate information, answer questions, and offer advice to the nurses who take care of children with T1D when they are at school.


Season of Giving:

Luca Polizzi, age 8, and Friends Band Together for Diabetes

On a recent weekday afternoon, 8-year-old Luca Polizzi proudly walked into his visit with pediatric endocrinologist Kristen Williams, MD with a large black shoebox in hand. He handed the box to Dr. Williams and told her that with the help of his “bike gang”, he raised money for the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center to help cure type 1 diabetes (T1D).


The Berrie Hosts A Preceptorial in Diabetes

The Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center hosted a “Preceptorial in Diabetes”, sponsored by the Endocrine Fellows Foundation, (EFF) which offered seven fellows from around the country a front row view of the vigorous research and quality clinical programs at the Berrie Center.


Diabetes Research Award Given for Work on Pancreatic Islets

Columbia University has presented the 2019 Naomi Berrie Award for Outstanding Achievement in Diabetes Research to Alvin C. Powers, MD, professor of medicine, molecular physiology, and biophysics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and director of the Vanderbilt Diabetes Center. Dr. Powers is the 21st winner of the annual award.


Step Right Up:

The Berrie Center Hosts a Carnival-Themed Halloween Party

Scarecrows and witches, black cats and clowns too all showed up for the Berrie Center’s much anticipated Halloween Party. In its 20th year, this year’s theme was the Berrie Center Fall Carnival and it truly was all fun and games.


Open Enrollment 2020

Choosing your health insurance plan is a crucial decision because, as everyone knows, living with and treating diabetes is expensive. Here are some things to consider during the Open Enrollment Period.


A career built on family values, curiosity and good fortune

PhD candidate Michael V. Zuccaro shares his story

Michael Zuccaro might be a highly intelligent scientist who is making his mark in the field of gene editing, but ask him to teach a group of 30, eight to twelve-year-olds with diabetes about the pancreas and that’s when he really shines.

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